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Monthly Archives: December 2011

Today’s baguette with preferment

I changed  the instant yeast amount and  method from this recipe that I have worked on for a couple of years.

1. I used 0.3g instant yeast  for preferment, and 0.2g instant yeast water for the final dough.

* I fermented the preferment dough for 14 hours at 68F and it rise 1.5 times in bulk.

2. I did 3 times stretch and fold every 45 minutes at 68F  and 1 hours later,  I moved the dough at 50F for cold bulk fermentation for 6 hours.

3.  I shaped without taking any bench time.  I wanted to take the bench time for 30 minutes or so because the dough was way too cold to make a long baguette..  I couldn’t stretch as much as I expected..

4. Proof    I took only 15 minutes.  I had to go on an errand.

it is very round and thick.

As I expected, there is no many holes in the crumb.

  But it was really tasty. The crumb was creamy, very silky and sweet. The crust was really thin and crispy. I will keep the instant yeast amount, then I will try the method with taking some bench time and more time for proofing.

 

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Koubo by Akiko is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on December 30, 2011 in Baguette

 

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How to determine how much your dough rises

To determine how much your dough rises, I will recommend to use this way.

To prepare:

  •  A container that you ferment for your baguette.
  • A baguette dough before fermenting ( bulk fermentation)
  • Volume measuring cup like Pyrex brand ones.
  • A  permanent marker and tape, or making tape.

Method:

1.   Put the baguette dough in the volume measuring cup and check how much volume the dough has. Mine was 250 ml or 275ml.

2. Take the dough out of the measuring cup and set a side in a different bowl and pour the same amount water that you measured the dough into the measuring cup. Then pour the water into the container that you ferment for your  dough and mark the line on the outside of your container.

3.  Pour the same amount water again, and pour it into the container and make it down with a parchment marker or tape.

Now you can see when your dough rises double in bulk.

For bread except baguettes, I ferment dough until it is tripled in bulk because I like softer crumb for that.

Note:  This works for my dough. Without using this method, I check out the top line of the dough in the container when I just ferment my dough, which is a little bit of above than  the 500ml line.  The  top line of dough tells me when the dough already  rises double in bulk.

Here is the some pictures that proved it to me.

This dough is about 1 cup in volume.

I transferred the dough into the glass bowl and marked the line of the top of the dough.

I poured 2 x 1cup water into…

the glass bowl. You can see the difference between 1 cup and 2 cup in the glass bowl, which is just little.

It is easier way to use a cylinder plastic container so that you can judge how much your dough rise clearly. I don’t use this for making a baguette or ciabatta  because it damage the crumb structure when I take the dough out.

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Koubo by Akiko is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

 
 

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Christmas tree with gingerbread cookies

Merry Christmas to everybody!

I hope that you will have  very nice Christmas.

One of my friends who taught me how to bake bread sent me this great recipes by e-mail. I was already into this Gingerbread tree cookies as soon as I read her email.   The icing is very good especially, and it is easy to decorate on the cookies. My 5 year-old daughter could draw it nicely,too.

Here is the recipe and the star  templates and the royal icing recipe.  But I don’t have the meringue power sugar,  She who also taught me the cookie recipe can’t get the ingredient.  She told me the great icing recipe below.

    Icing ingredients:

  •   1 egg white
  • 1 +1/2 cup confectioner powder sugar
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp lemon juice

Method:

  Beat all the ingredients until foamy and done.

 I used the cookie dough recipe from here.  This gingerbread cookie dough is our family’s favorite. I may try the one that is from the gingerbread tree’s for interest someday.

I change the recipe a little bit because I don’t use baking soda in it.

Christmas tree with gingerbread cookies   (  I made 2 Christmas trees)

 Ingredients:

  • 16 Tbsp butter  ( I used  homemade unsalted butter )
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1  cup Grandma’s molasses
  • 2 eggs
  •  4 cups King Arthur All purpose flour
  • 3 tsp baking powder ( I used Rumford )
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3 tsp  baking spice mix ( I used this one. )

Method:

Prepare:  Mix all the dry ingredients in a bowl.

  1. Beat the egg and sugar using a hand mixer or stand mixer until it is foamy.
  2. Add the molasses and eggs, beat it again  until incorporated.
  3. Add the dry ingredients and mix using a paddle or rubber spatula  like cutting vegetables until well combined.
  4. Divided it into 3 balls and wrap them with plastic wrap tightly and leave them in a refrigerator for at least 2 hours.
  5. Preheat 350F  and Shape: Roll it out  a 5 mm thick circle or rectangle.  For a star templates I cut it out one at time using a dough cutter to cut the shape out, which is easy to work with.
  6. Bake  8-10 minutes at 350 F.   The smallest one will be 6 minutes.

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Koubo by Akiko is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

 
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Posted by on December 22, 2011 in Gingerbread cookie

 

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Baguette: My proofing board

I have used  a * homemade baguette board for proofing to keep the dough round  for a year, but I realized that it may damage the crumb structure in the dough by my mistake.

Here is my baguette board for proofing.  I just cut a center roll of  wrapping paper in a half.

                                                                                   I pressed down the board to adjust the curb.

Here is what I found out that I might make a big mistake.

I made a very long baguette with preferment about 60 cm on 12/20/2011.I cut the dough little bit so that the baguette can fit in my oven , and I cut the short dough in a half again, then proofed the one without the board,and the other one was used the board.

    Here is the result:

I don’t know which one is which!    I forgot it!!

      I am going to test it again to make sure which one is better.

                    I will bake more baguettes tomorrow…..

———————————————————

Updated 12/27/2011

I think that I shouldn’t use the wrapping paper’s center roll  board for proofing anymore because of this result.

It doesn’t look good because I took this crumb shot at night.  I hope you can see the open crumb all over.

  I proof the dough like the way :

but I cover it with a big plastic bag when it is proofed like this:

* When I proofed the baguette dough without the plastic bag, the baguette came out pretty dense and the dough was not silky.

    This is the result of the baguette without the plastic bag.

  This baguette was proofed with the plastic bags.   Over all, the baguettes that I have tried many times with the plastic bag have more open crumb than the one without the plastic bags.  I also tried the baguette without the plastic bags more than 20 times. all of them came out pretty dense.

I think that every bread dough need to be proofed with  moisture.

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Koubo by Akiko is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on December 22, 2011 in Baguette

 

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Baguette with raisin yeast water

I have tried to get perfect crumb of  my baguette for a couple of years, and I haven’t still gotten the crumb that I want.  I am getting close to my dream baguette, but it is always imperfect.

This baguette is used raisin yeast water.  This is a 54cm long baguette.

Ingredients:

  • 180g  King Arthur All purpose flour
  • 21 g  raisin yeast water
  • 105 g filtered water
  • 3.2 g salt

                    

The crumb picture at the right on the top  is too fine, and the crumb picture at the right on the bottom is telling me something that I didn’t a good job on the right side when I shaped, but I don’t know what I did unfortunately. I will post when I complete this recipe.

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Koubo by Akiko is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

 
6 Comments

Posted by on December 17, 2011 in Baguette

 

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How to make homemade butter and buttermilk

It is pretty easy to make homemade butter, and it tastes so much better than the stored one.   My 13 year-old son started it at first.  He pour about 1/4 cup heavy whipping cream in a small jar that is sterilized, then shook it for 20 minutes around until it separates the butter ( solid) from the buttermilk ( liquid). Then he squeezed the excess buttermilk from the butter and covered the butter with plastic wrap very tightly and refrigerated it.  He dumped the liquid ( buttermilk) at this time. We didn’t know about  the liquid was buttermilk!

I use a stand mixer or hand mixer because I can make homemade butter and buttermilk within 10 minutes.

How to make homemade butter and buttermilk

Ingredient:

  •   Heavy whipping cream   ( as much as  you want )
  •   1.5-1.6 % salt as to unsalted butter’s weight  if you want to make salted butter.

1) Pour some heavy whipping cream in a bowl and beat the cream at 10 speed ( highest speed ) until it curdles.

2) Place the butter into a cheese cloth ( or linen cloth ) and squeeze out any excess buttermilk . Don’t throw the liquid, it is real buttermilk.

3) Gather all the butter and put in plastic wrap and wrap it up very tightly and refrigerate it.

 you can add 1.5-1.6% salt as to the butter’s weight and knead until incorporated is you want to make salted butter.

Don’t forget to refrigerate the buttermilk, too!

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Koubo by Akiko is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on December 16, 2011 in How to make homemade butter and buttermilk

 

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When I looked back at my croissants that I have made..

When I looked back at my croissants that I have made in a couple of months,  I found out something that I should care about…

                                                                                                                11/17

12/14

                                                                                                                      11/23

  

All of  the croissant’s method was the same except one thing.  After I cut the dough into a triangle shape, I put them in the refrigerator for 15 minutes and I stretched out the triangle dough using a rolling-pin and put it in the refrigerator for 30 minutes before shaping.  This process is the same. But, I changed the pressure when  I stretched out  the triangle dough to expand.   12/14’s croissants was rolled out from the top to the bottom by a rolling-pin. The others are gently pressed down by a rolling-pin and my hand.

I think that the crumb structure  is more natural when I use my hand to stretch out the dough at the final step before shaping.

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Koubo by Akiko is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on December 16, 2011 in Croissant

 

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